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Can songs help students learn?

Bold Blog - January 18, 2019 4997

San Francisco Foghorn, flickr.com, CC BY-SA 2.0

“If I look at the mass, I will never act. If I look at the one, I will”: Why statistics are no match for a good story

The Chronicle of Evidence-Based Mentoring - January 17, 2019 4977

Spilt milk

Learning with e's - January 17, 2019 4958

Better natures — MIT Media Lab

Media Lab - January 17, 2019 4955

Mixed Realities, Virtual Reality, and Augmented Reality in Scholarly Publishing: An Interview with Markus Kaindl and Martijn Roelandse

The Scholarly Kitchen - January 17, 2019 4945

Augmented reality is increasingly being used in scholarly publishing -- in expected and unexpected ways. Learn how Springer Nature has been experimenting with it in this interview with their Senior Manager of Semantic Data, Markus Kaindl, and Head of Innovation, Martijn Roelandse.


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Assessments can support, not just measure, student learning

Hechinger Report - January 16, 2019 4932

Editor’s note: This story led off this week’s Future of Learning newsletter, which is delivered free to subscribers’ inboxes every Wednesday with trends and top stories about education innovation. Subscribe today! Assessments have a bad rap in schools. Tests stress students out; they can be high-stakes for schools and teachers. But the word assessment describes […]


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TEACHER VOICE: Will students fail if teachers can’t make a living wage?

Hechinger Report - January 16, 2019 4932

Pressured out of the middle class — is that what a master’s degree and 16 years of experience get you as a teacher in America? I wasn’t surprised to read about educators struggling financially, and not just because it was one of the biggest sticking points in recent teacher-contract negotiations in New York City and […]


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America’s colleges struggle to envision the future of diversity on campus

Hechinger Report - January 16, 2019 4900

NEW ORLEANS —“Diversity” was top of mind when Angel Carter was applying to schools. Raised in an African-American enclave in Atlanta, she said, “I would have loved to go to an HBCU,” the acronym for historically black colleges and universities. But college should stretch you, she felt, so Carter chose Tulane, where the student body […]


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7 great developments in internet safety that happened in 2018

Parenting for Digital Fututre - January 16, 2019 4900

Amidst many negative headlines throughout 2018 about safety and wellbeing of children online, there were some positive stories too. Here Anne Collier outlines developments in areas including cyberbullying, screen time, social-emotional literacy, content moderation and policy on fake news. Anne Collier is founder and executive director of The Net Safety Collaborative, home of the US’s social media helpline for schools. She has been writing […]

Different Places, Different Voices

The Scholarly Kitchen - January 16, 2019 4890

Highlighting a sampling of posts by authors from around the globe to help raise awareness of the communication needs and concerns of the international scholarly community.


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Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Baffling Funder Mandate

The Scholarly Kitchen - January 15, 2019 4835

Famed detective Sherlock Holmes does his best to help his friend Dr. Watson figure out how best to comply with the requirements of Plan S.


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Minnesota has a persistent higher-ed gap: Are new efforts making a difference?

Hechinger Report - January 14, 2019 4822

MANKATO, Minn. — Adley Nyakora, 18, bends over the body of a bloated man in polka-dot boxers, examining a bucket lodged in the patient’s knee. He picks up a medical instrument and slowly lowers it, his brow furrowed in concentration. His friends, who hover over him, hold their breath. Nykora aims for the bucket … […]


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Students are supposed to read The Scarlet Letter, not wear it

Hechinger Report - January 14, 2019 4822

Every student at Mingus Union High School in Cottonwood, Ariz. is now required to wear color-coded ID badges. In the past, red badges denoted a student’s rank as an underclassman. Juniors and seniors wore gray badges. Beyond distinguishing between older and younger students, color coding provided a sense of progression, rank and seniority. However, last […]


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What have Mississippi legislators proposed for education in the first few days of the legislative session?

Hechinger Report - January 14, 2019 4822

Editor’s note: This story led off this week’s Mississippi Learning newsletter, which is delivered free to subscribers’ inboxes with trends and top stories about education in Mississippi. Subscribe today! Mississippi’s legislative session started less than a week ago but the first pieces of legislation have already been submitted and referred to committees. They include several bills […]


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Insurgent Genealogies: The Poetic and Pedagogical Praxis of Audre Lorde, June Jordan, Toni Cade Bambara, and Adrienne Rich

Remaking the University - January 14, 2019 4813

by Danica Savonick, Asst Professor of English, SUNY CourtlandChris here: this is the first in a series of papers delivered at an MLA Convention panel called "Race and Critical University Studies," organized by Heather Steffen and me and held on 5 January 2019.  Prof. Savonick gets at a key motive behind the panel when she says below, "Critical university studies puts a name on something that activists, intellectuals, and scholars of African American studies, women’s studies, and ethnic studies have been doing for decades and even centuries.